Thoughts About SCOTUS Ruling On Gay Marriage

It seems everyone has something to say about the ruling on gay marriage. And I’ve debated whether or not I even want to say anything about it. I think I’ll probably anger people no matter what I say, and I don’t know how much profit there is to adding yet another voice to the mix. But, I guess since I have a blog, like everyone else I feel compelled to speak just because I can. So here are my (as brief as possible but not brief enough) thoughts.

  • It appears to me that most people talking are not listening, empathizing, or even trying to understand.
  • The definition of marriage, insofar as it is between two consenting adults, has been left to the conscience of the individual and is no longer bound by the state. This is not the same as the state defining marriage or telling us what we believe.
  • From the perspective of the Bible, marriage has always been both a civil and religious institution. That is, marriages existing outside the faith or counter to God’s original plan for marriage are recognized by the Bible and treated as valid.
  • The U.S. Constitution grants people the freedom to make religious choices. This means that people are free to be wrong.
  • Supporters of gay marriage are not going to understand crying oppression because someone is being given more freedom. It’s one thing to believe that freedom is a freedom to sin; it’s another thing to say that you are being persecuted for freedom being given to someone else.
  • The Bible says that it is not the job of the Christian to judge non-Christians.
  • My hope is not in my country or the rules that govern us. It never was and never will be.
  • If you want to have a conversation about an issue that is so core to a person that he or she believes it is a part of his or her being, you will make more progress if you wait until you are invited to speak. To do otherwise is to give the impression that you believe you have authority over that person, and you do not.
  • To demand a person act against his or her beliefs is a very real concern. If someone views a wedding ceremony as a sacred act, demanding by law he or she must perform in a way counter to his or her religion is violating the first amendment.
  • This issue was decide a long time ago. It has merely been made official. It’s long overdue for us to move beyond the rhetoric and politics to real conversations with real people about what it means to struggle and find meaning in this life.
  • It appears to me that most people talking are not listening, empathizing, or even trying to understand (worth repeating).
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About Jeff S

Programmer, musician, father, and lover of Jesus. I have a strong passion to see people free from abuse and religion misused so that they can find the ultimate empowered life in Jesus.
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One Response to Thoughts About SCOTUS Ruling On Gay Marriage

  1. dpersson7 says:

    “If you want to have a conversation about an issue that is so core to a person that he or she believes it is a part of his or her being, you will make more progress if you wait until you are invited to speak. To do otherwise is to give the impression that you believe you have authority over that person, and you do not.”
    This is what I think sums up how we as Christians should approach any social or moral issue that does not involve the oppression of another human being or group. Daniel and Joseph are two prime examples of this. They both developed relationships with those from the foreign cultures they were forced into and eventually won positions of influence by their character. Neither one of them pushed their way in and started demanding obedience to God’s laws. They adapted as much as they could to the surrounding culture and God worked through them. Jesus himself never demanded anything from anyone. He offered a different way, but allowed individuals to make the choice.

    Liked by 1 person

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